Tag Archives: South Africa

On the road to Soweto

Julian Photo

In this blog post, Julian Brown writes about his new book exploring the broader historical and political context in which Soweto emerged. Julian is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Political Studies at the University of the Witwatersrand, in Johannesburg. He is also author of South Africa’s Insurgent Citizens: On dissent and the possibility […]

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Twilight policing: Understanding private security in Durban, South Africa

Tessa Diphoorn

In this blog, Tessa Diphoorn discusses the main ideas of her new book, Twilight Policing: Private Security and Violence in urban South Africa, and how it provides a new lens to understanding violence and security in South Africa. Based on in-depth ethnographic fieldwork, she proposes to move beyond the non-state/state binary that remains to be […]

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President Zuma responds to student protests

Following mass protests by students across South Africa, President Jacob Zuma has moved to freeze tuition fees. However, this strategy is unlikely to pacify students or to enable the ruling party to win back the confidence of urban voters. The future success of the ANC will therefore depend on recalibrating its support base away from […]

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The language of politics in South Africa

holmes_job

Carolyn Holmes tells us about her work exploring how print cultures service different language communities and how they fuel nationalisms that are not synonymous with the nation state. Carolyn’s research has recently been published in African Affairs. Carolyn is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science at Bucknell University, and a Research Associate in the Department […]

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Xenophobia and the elusive Pan African dream

Editor: Nic Cheeseman

In his regular column for the Daily Nation, Nic Cheeseman reflects on the latest wave of xenophobia attacks that have spread across South Africa, explores the drivers of this violence, and asks what the lessons and implications are for both country and continent.

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Double take: How does education affect politics in Africa?

south-africa

Most attempts to understand how education affects politics miss the point, argues Dan Hodkinson. To understand the link between the two, we need to look again at student experience. Dan is a PhD candidate at the Oxford Department of International Development, at the University of Oxford.

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#Rhodesmustfall: institutional racism in South Africa and beyond

Sarah-Jane Cooper-Knock

Our Co-editor, Sarah Jane Cooper-Knock, explores the recent protests around institutional racism at the University of Cape Town and Rhodes University in South Africa. She also asks what questions these protests raise for universities beyond South Africa.

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South Africa – President Zuma survives no-confidence vote but many questions remain

south-africa

In this post, Michaela Collord explores Zuma’s survival of the no-confidence in the National Assembly, and future parliamentary prospects in this dominant party democracy.

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New Questions: Hannah Dawson

Hannah Dawson

Continuing our series on new questions for academia, Hannah Dawson explores the issue of unemployment in South Africa and its implications for young people. Hannah is a Research Associate at Chair in Social Change at the University of Johannesburg and DPhil candidate at School of Geography, Oxford University.

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‘We are the relay team': remembering Mandela

SJ_CK

On this, the first anniversary of Mandela’s death, we repost a blog by our Co-editor Sarah-Jane Cooper-Knock, reflecting on the way in which Mandela has been remembered and the responsibilities that come with saluting his long walk to freedom. This post originally appeared on 8th December 2013.

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