Tag Archives: South Africa

#Rhodesmustfall: institutional racism in South Africa and beyond

Sarah-Jane Cooper-Knock

Our Co-editor, Sarah Jane Cooper-Knock, explores the recent protests around institutional racism at the University of Cape Town and Rhodes University in South Africa. She also asks what questions these protests raise for universities beyond South Africa.

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New Questions: Hannah Dawson

Hannah Dawson

Continuing our series on new questions for academia, Hannah Dawson explores the issue of unemployment in South Africa and its implications for young people. Hannah is a Research Associate at Chair in Social Change at the University of Johannesburg and DPhil candidate at School of Geography, Oxford University.

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‘We are the relay team': remembering Mandela

SJ_CK

On this, the first anniversary of Mandela’s death, we repost a blog by our Co-editor Sarah-Jane Cooper-Knock, reflecting on the way in which Mandela has been remembered and the responsibilities that come with saluting his long walk to freedom. This post originally appeared on 8th December 2013.

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President Zuma escapes censure for no show in South Africa

Editor: Nic Cheeseman

In this post, our co-editor Nic Cheeseman explores recent events in South Africa’s National Assembly, which led to a motion to censure President Jacob Zuma. This post originally appeared on the Presidential Power blog. 

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Youth and political protest in South Africa

hannah_spii

In this blog, Hannah Dawson draws upon her research on political protest in Zandspruit informal settlement on the outskirts of Johannesburg during 2011, to provide insight into the lives of a number of youth who participated in protests. This work draws out some of the key features of the changing nature of political action among youth and […]

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Performing opposition in the South African National Assembly

Malema

In this blog, Rachel Johnson makes the case for exploring disruptive performances in South Africa’s National Assembly. This approach can give us a new perspective on dominant party democracy in post-apartheid South Africa. Rachel is a lecturer in African History at the University of Durham.

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South African Elections 2014 – after the party, the long view: part two

DSCF6080

In this two-part blog, Matthew Kustenbauder unpacks the South African election results, highlighting historic trends, new developments, and future possibilities. In this second post, Matthew explores the rural-urban divide in the electoral landscape and looks at prospects for non-racialism going forward. Matthew is a Fulbright Fellow and PhD candidate in history at Harvard University.

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South African Elections 2014 – after the party, the long view

DSCF6080

In this two-part blog, Matthew Kustenbauder unpacks the South African election results, highlighting historic trends, new developments, and future possibilities. In his first post, Matthew deals with the long duree of the ANC and the DA, taking an optimistic position on the prospects of the DA. His second post will explore the growing urban and […]

Posted in South Africa | Also tagged , , , , | 1 Response

Press freedom debates and journalism scholarship in South Africa

Herman Wasserman

Kicking off our series on the media and democracy, Herman Wasserman highlights the role that academics can play in ongoing debates over media freedom. He focuses in on the role played by journalism scholars and educators in response to proposed reforms in South Africa. Herman is a Professor of Media Studies at Rhodes University and […]

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South Africa at the polls, and beyond.

Sarah-Jane Cooper-Knock

In this blog piece our Co-editor, Sarah-Jane Cooper-Knock, takes a look at the run-up to South Africa’s polls, and the longer-term political questions that remain for citizens in South Africa. Sarah Jane is a Fellow at the London School of Economics. 

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