Tag Archives: African Democracy

The politics of zoonotic diseases in Africa

James Smith

In this article, James Smith explores the questions that we should be asking about global health as the Ebola is brought under control in East Africa. James is Vice Principal International at the University of Edinburgh and Professor of African and Development Studies.

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Free to stitch or starve: Capitalism and unfreedom in the global garment industry

stitch

In this blog, Alessandra Mezzadri argues that whilst there has been an increased amount of attention on ‘modern slavery’ and forced labour in the garment industry, there are broader forms of unfreedom that ensnare the workers who stitch our clothing. Alessandra is a lecturer in Development at the SOAS.

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Global Tax Justice Event in Edinburgh: Tuesday 17th Feb

Tax Justice Poster

Tomorrow, one of our regular contributors – Alex Cobham – will be speaking at the University of Edinburgh on the need for Global Tax Justice. The event is free and open to the public. You can find Alex at Appleton Tower room 2:14 from 5pm. 

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New Questions: Hannah Dawson

Hannah Dawson

Continuing our series on new questions for academia, Hannah Dawson explores the issue of unemployment in South Africa and its implications for young people. Hannah is a Research Associate at Chair in Social Change at the University of Johannesburg and DPhil candidate at School of Geography, Oxford University.

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Just like us? The consolidation of Tunisian democracy

Francesco

Following the elections in Tunisia, Francesco Cavatorta asks how we should understand the the process of consolidation that is now under way. Francesco is a Professor at the University of Laval.

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Decentralization and ‘repertoires of domination’ in Sub-Saharan Africa

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Pedro Frizo explores decentralisation in Senegal, and beyond, analysing the tensions that often emerge between decentralisation and democracy.

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The rise of President Edgar Lungu and the 2015 Zambian elections

Nicole Beardsworth

In this blog Nicole Beardsworth explores what is in store for the government and the country with Edgar Lungu taking the helm as President of Zambia. Nicole Beardsworth is a South African political analyst and doctoral candidate at the University of Warwick.

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The Hearing Voices Project: Building a platform for peacebuilding

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In this blog, David Roberts introduces his new site, the ‘Hearing Voices Project’, arguing that there is a need for a fresh approach to peacebuilding that harnesses the internet to capture people’s hopes and plans for peace. David is a lecturer in International Relations at the University of Loughborough. For more information, you can get […]

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Why is it so difficult to predict a winner in Zambia?

zambia

In this blog, Catherine Boone and Michael Wahman ask why so much uncertainty surrounds the outcome of the Presidential polls, which are due to be announced tomorrow. Catherine is a Professor of Comparative Politics and Michael is a Swedish Research Council Fellow. Both are at the London School of Economics and Political Science.

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New Year, New Questions: Michael Wahman

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In this latest in the series of New Year, New Questions, Michael Wahman pushes for a focus on sub-national dynamics of electoral politics in Africa, and beyond. Michael is a Swedish Research Council Fellow at the London School of Economics. He specializes in research on elections, democratization and African politics.

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