Category Archives: Uncategorized

Agri-food industry growth and the land grab in north-east Africa

Egypt

In this blog, Marion Dixon explores the changing food regime in Egypt, as well as the political implications of this shifting food nexus in the country, and beyond. A full account of this research has been published in the Review of African Political Economy. Marion is lecturer at the Department of Development Sociology, Cornell University.

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Incumbency and opportunity: forecasting trends in Nigeria’s 2015 elections

Nigeria

In this blog, Olly Owen and Zainab Usman explore the course that Nigeria’s 2015 elections could take. Their analysis highlights the possibility of a run-off election for the first time under Nigeria’s current electoral system. Olly is a Junior Research Fellow and Zainab is a DPhil candidate. Both are based in the Oxford Department of […]

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Chalwe Charles Mwansa on LGBT activism in Zambia

In_Their_Own_Words

Earlier this year, we heard about the situation facing LGBT citizens in Zambia. Could you give us a brief update of the situation on the ground?  While lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender rights in some sections of the world have progressed in recent years, equality remains elusive in other parts of the world, such as Zambia. On the […]

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Is there a developmental model of the internet emerging in Africa?

satellite

In this article, Iginio Gagliardone and Frederick Golooba-Mutebi explore the approach that Rwanda and Ethiopia have been taking towards information and communications technology (ICT), and ask whether we could be seeing the emergence of a developmental model of the internet. Frederick is a Political Scientist and Senior Research Fellow at the Makerere Institute of Social Research in […]

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Youth and political protest in South Africa

hannah_spii

In this blog, Hannah Dawson draws upon her research on political protest in Zandspruit informal settlement on the outskirts of Johannesburg during 2011, to provide insight into the lives of a number of youth who participated in protests. This work draws out some of the key features of the changing nature of political action among youth and […]

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Political problems and possibilities in Lesotho

lesotho

In this blog, Jeffrey Smith and John Aerni Flessner look at recent political ruptures in Lesotho, and prospects for the future. They argue that political pragmatism and compromise could win out. If it does, the country could continue to push forward some of the promising democratic and developmental achievements it has made in recent year.

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From fundamentalism to conservatism: The Tunisian Islamist party and the process of democratization.

tunisia

In this blog, Francesco Cavatorta and Fabio Merone reflect on the trajectory of the Nahda party in Tunisia. Unlike the Islamist parties in many other Arab states, this party has becoming increasingly moderate since its inception. What can we learn from Nahda? What does their experience tell us about the fate of Political Islamism and […]

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Reconsidering regime type and growth: Lies, dictatorships, and statistics

Logo

In this blog, Professor Christopher Magee and Professor John Doces tell us about their innovative research, which sheds light on the exaggerated growth rates that many dictatorships publish. The findings of their research were recently published in full in International Studies Quarterly. Christopher Magee is professor of economics at Bucknell University. John Doces is assistant professor of […]

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Hypocrisy and forgetfulness: The critique of state capitalism

ian-bosch

In this post, Ian Taylor tells us about his recent research on state capitalism and the oil sector in Africa. He argues that companies from Brazil, China, India, South Korea, and Turkey are increasingly competitive trading partners for countries across the continent and explores some of the unfair criticisms and real challenges that this shift […]

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Angola – Africa’s ‘hot’ cold war

In this short video, made for the School’s History Network, Dr Miles Larmer look at America’s policies towards Angola, and explores how Angola’s war of decolonisation became a ‘local battle in the global cold war’. Miles is a University Lecturer in African History at the University of Oxford.

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