Category Archives: South Africa

Moving Beyond Movements: Everyday citizenship in South Africa

SJCK Profile pic

In this post, Co-editor SJ Cooper-Knock talks about her recent work that pushes the boundaries of research on social movements in South Africa by paying greater attention to the everyday citizenship of their members. 

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Pressure mounts on President Zuma

Editor: Nic Cheeseman

Nic Cheeseman reflects on the political life and times of Jacob Zuma, and questions whether he will survive the State of Capture report, which uncovered the hold that the Gupta family have secured on the state.

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When is it legitimate to break the law? Reflections on the life of Bram Fischer

Editor: Nic Cheeseman

Following the recent Bram Fischer Memorial Lecture at the University of Oxford, Nic Cheeseman reflects on when it is legitimate to break the law. This piece originally appeared in Nic’s regular column for the Daily Nation. 

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#RhodesMustFall: Tadiwanashe Madenga

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At the ASAUK earlier this month, the Centre of African Studies at the University of Edinburgh hosted a series of panels on Decolonising the Academy. Tadiwanashe Madenga joined the panel digitally to present: ‘ #RhodesMustFallOxford: Decolonization and the Myth of Western Neutrality at the University of Oxford’.

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Interim notes on the South African local elections

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Our Co-editor SJ Cooper-Knock shared some early thoughts on the local election results in South Africa. This post was written on Saturday morning, more analysis will follow after the final election results are announced.

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On the road to Soweto

Julian Photo

In this blog post, Julian Brown writes about his new book exploring the broader historical and political context in which Soweto emerged. Julian is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Political Studies at the University of the Witwatersrand, in Johannesburg. He is also author of South Africa’s Insurgent Citizens: On dissent and the possibility […]

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Twilight policing: Understanding private security in Durban, South Africa

Tessa Diphoorn

In this blog, Tessa Diphoorn discusses the main ideas of her new book, Twilight Policing: Private Security and Violence in urban South Africa, and how it provides a new lens to understanding violence and security in South Africa. Based on in-depth ethnographic fieldwork, she proposes to move beyond the non-state/state binary that remains to be […]

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The language of politics in South Africa

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Carolyn Holmes tells us about her work exploring how print cultures service different language communities and how they fuel nationalisms that are not synonymous with the nation state. Carolyn’s research has recently been published in African Affairs. Carolyn is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science at Bucknell University, and a Research Associate in the Department […]

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Xenophobia and the elusive Pan African dream

Editor: Nic Cheeseman

In his regular column for the Daily Nation, Nic Cheeseman reflects on the latest wave of xenophobia attacks that have spread across South Africa, explores the drivers of this violence, and asks what the lessons and implications are for both country and continent.

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Double take: How does education affect politics in Africa?

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Most attempts to understand how education affects politics miss the point, argues Dan Hodkinson. To understand the link between the two, we need to look again at student experience. Dan is a PhD candidate at the Oxford Department of International Development, at the University of Oxford.

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