Author Archives: Nic Cheeseman

Africa in 2017: The political road ahead

Editor: Nic Cheeseman

Nic Cheeseman reflects on some of the discussions emerging from the recent Royal African Society event ‘Africa in 2017: Prospects and Forecasts’ at the University of Birmingham. Nic argues that this will be a big political year for the continent, outlining some of the changes that have already emerged and others that are round the corner.

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Democracy in Africa: The Movie

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In a new (short) film, Democracy in Africa’s Co-editor Nic Cheeseman talks about his recent book, the prospects for democracy in Africa, and the importance of this political moment. The interview covers the challenges facing democratisation across the continent, the drivers of Africa’s democratic successes, and visions for African democracies in the future. Will the paths of these […]

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Pressure mounts on President Zuma

Editor: Nic Cheeseman

Nic Cheeseman reflects on the political life and times of Jacob Zuma, and questions whether he will survive the State of Capture report, which uncovered the hold that the Gupta family have secured on the state.

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When is it legitimate to break the law? Reflections on the life of Bram Fischer

Editor: Nic Cheeseman

Following the recent Bram Fischer Memorial Lecture at the University of Oxford, Nic Cheeseman reflects on when it is legitimate to break the law. This piece originally appeared in Nic’s regular column for the Daily Nation. 

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Deconstructing the Magufuli miracle in Tanzania 

Our co-editor Nic Cheeseman takes a look at the rise and rule of Magufuli in Tanzania. He argues that his successes as a populist leader are likely to be short-lived, and the costs to democracy and development are likely to be great. This piece is drawn from Nic’s regular column for the Daily Nation.

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Uhuru cannot start planning second term yet

Nic Cheeseman

Some commentators are claiming that the Jubilee Party have the 2017 in the bag. Taking a look at both the history of past parties and the current political landscape, Nic Cheeseman argues that we cannot be so sure. This blog was originally published in Nic’s regular column for the Daily Nation.

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The myth about democracy in Africa

Editor: Nic Cheeseman

In his regular column for the Daily Nation, our co-editor Nic Cheeseman highlights the importance of democratic ideas and memories in the ongoing struggles for democratisation across the continent.

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Save the Afrobarometer: Why African opinion polls are so important

Our Co-editor, Nic Cheeseman, highlights the uncertain fate of the Afro-barometer and explains why its closure would be such a great loss to academics and politicians across the continent. 

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Should we abandon the sister-party approach to democracy promotion?

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Susan Dodsworth and our Co-Editor, Nic Cheeseman, interrogate whether partnering political parties with purportedly similar political ideologies is a helpful means of democracy promotion. Their paper will be available here, later this week. 

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President Kenyatta’s battle over the Electoral Commission

Editor: Nic Cheeseman

Nic Cheeseman takes a look at the recent contestation over the Electoral Commission in Kenya, in which protesting citizens were brutally repressed by the police. Nic asks what the chances are for meaningful reform and what this tells us about Kenyatta’s personality as president. 

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