Author Archives: Democracy in Africa

Protest, pastors and the courts in Zimbabwe

Sara Rich Dorman

Sara Rich Dorman reflects on recent development in the #ThisFlag movement, including the release of Pastor Evan Mawarire. Placing developments in their broader political and historical context, she argues that there is cause for both caution and celebration in the wake of the Pastor’s release. Sara is a lecturer at the University of Edinburgh. Her book […]

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Interventions and the (de)stabilizing of sovereignty in Africa

Justifying interventions

In this post,  Nina Wilén tells us about her new book ‘Justifying Interventions in Africa: (de)stabilizing sovereignty in Liberia, Burundi, and the Congo. Nina is a Post-doctoral Research Fellow with the Fund for Scientific Research (FNRS) in Belgium.

Posted in Liberia | 1 Response

#thisflag and the power of nationalism in Zimbabwe

Sara Rich Dorman

Sara Rich Dorman takes a look at the #thisflag movement in Zimbabwe and asks why the country’s flag has been relatively absent from protest politics to date. Sara is a Lecturer in Politics at the University of Edinburgh. She tweets at @afr_pol.

Posted in Zimbabwe | Tagged , , , , | 3 Responses

Closing the camps: Kenya’s déjà-vu politics

kenya

Hanno Brankamp explores refugee politics in Kenya. The government’s announced closure of its refugee camps is not just a worrying déjà-vu; it is driven by national politics and a renewed bid for more donor funding. While it seems highly unlikely that Kenya will actually close Dadaab, the government is likely to seek a diplomatic horse trade. Hanno is a DPhil […]

Posted in Kenya, Politics of (im)mobility | Tagged , , | 7 Responses

Associations and Democracy in Algeria

Jessica Northey

Jessica Northey kicks off our new series looking back on the Arab Spring, five years on. Her recent article in Democratization taps into broader debates on associational life in North Africa and the Middle East. Have associations in these countries been coopted by authoritarian governments? What part do associations play in explaining why the Arab Spring […]

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Kenya: Thanking the Lord for power, control, and dropped charges at the ICC

Uhuru 1

Following a recent thanksgiving ceremony to celebrate the ICC’s charges being dropped, Gregory Deacon explores the relationship between religion and politics in Kenya. Gregory is an independent researcher and adjunct assistant professor at Union College, New York. Pictures by Ruth Kenyah.

Posted in Kenya | Tagged , , , | 2 Responses

Twilight policing: Understanding private security in Durban, South Africa

Tessa Diphoorn

In this blog, Tessa Diphoorn discusses the main ideas of her new book, Twilight Policing: Private Security and Violence in urban South Africa, and how it provides a new lens to understanding violence and security in South Africa. Based on in-depth ethnographic fieldwork, she proposes to move beyond the non-state/state binary that remains to be […]

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Event: How to strengthen legislatures in new democracies

The Westminster Foundation for Democracy is hosting an exciting new event as part of their  project on the political economy of democracy promotion on 17 March 2016.

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Land rights and mobility: the unintended consequences of durable solutions in Tanzania

Amelia Kuch

Amelia Kuch takes a look at Tanzania, where durable solutions have been offered to Burundian refugees. New political rules are now in play for these citizens but, as Amelia shows, older ways of organising land and livelihoods in settlement areas are still alive and well.  Amelia is a PhD candidate in African Studies at the University of […]

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Democracy in Africa: Lessons from Malawi

What are the key lessons that the Malawian elections of 2014 can offer for those studying democracy and democratisation? In the wake of their latest edited book, Nandini Patel and Michael Wahman explain. Nandini is Chairperson of Institute for Policy Interaction (IPI) in Malawi. Michael is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Political Science of the University of Missouri.

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